Archive for 'Cardio & Blood-Сholesterol'

REDUCING YOUR RISK OF CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE: TYPES I AND II DIABETES

Posted on July 3, 2011, under Cardio & Blood-Сholesterol.

Type l diabetes often occurs in younger people (it used to be called juvenile-onset diabetes) and affects about 1 million Americans. It is caused by decreased or no insulin production by the pancreas. The high blood levels of glucose (called hyperglycemia: hyper means “high,” give means “sweet,” emia means “in the blood”) must be regulated by insulin injections to compensate for the deficiency of insulin production.
Type II diabetes is much more common than type I diabetes. It is known to affect at least 7 million Americans. Another 5 to 7 million people probably have type II diabetes but are unaware of it. More than 75 percent of people who have type II diabetes are over- weight. Evidently, obesity is a “trigger,” causing diabetes to develop in genetically vulnerable people. For them, the problem is both a deficiency of insulin and an inability of their body’s cells to respond appropriately to the insulin that is there. Evidence is mounting that exercise lowers the risk of type II diabetes developing, even in people who are overweight or who have a family history of diabetes. The best treatment for type II diabetes is weight loss, but if this is not achievable, then oral medications, or insulin injections, may be required.
*267\252\8*
Google Bookmarks Digg Reddit del.icio.us Ma.gnolia Technorati Slashdot Yahoo My Web

CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM AND HIGH-FAT DIET

Posted on January 31, 2011, under Cardio & Blood-Сholesterol.

Volumes of scientific literature support the negative impact of a high-fat diet on the cardiovascular system. A high-fat diet contributes to obesity, which increases peripheral resistance in the arterioles and can drive blood pressure up. It is a proven factor in atherosclerosis, which narrows the “pipes.” Fat also interferes with insulin utilization and contributes to insulin resistance, which is a significant factor in many cases of hypertension.
Dr. Salah Kassab, of the University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson, suggests that a high-fat diet also results in sodium retention, which increases blood volume and drives up blood pressure. This was demonstrated in an experiment in which dogs were fed a high-fat diet for a period of five weeks. Not only did the dogs gain an average of 8 pounds, but their blood pressure and heart rate also rose considerably. By the end of the study, their diastolic blood pressure soared from 87 to 91 mm Hg, and the resting heart rate increased a whopping 20 beats per minute (from 83 to 113).
The kind of fat you eat makes a difference, too. Fats that contribute to heart disease include cholesterol-laden saturated fats from meat, eggs and high-fat dairy products, and overly processed vegetable oils. When polyunsaturated vegetable oils are processed under high temperatures, they may transmute into unnatural breakdown products that are harmful to the arteries. Margarine and solid vegetable shortening are particularly dangerous as their processing results in the formation of toxic trans fatty acids. These altered fats – which are like nothing Mother Nature ever intended – interfere with some of your body’s important functions. In Part II you’ll learn about beneficial fats that actually help reverse hypertension.
*28/313/5*

CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM AND HIGH-FAT DIETVolumes of scientific literature support the negative impact of a high-fat diet on the cardiovascular system. A high-fat diet contributes to obesity, which increases peripheral resistance in the arterioles and can drive blood pressure up. It is a proven factor in atherosclerosis, which narrows the “pipes.” Fat also interferes with insulin utilization and contributes to insulin resistance, which is a significant factor in many cases of hypertension.Dr. Salah Kassab, of the University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson, suggests that a high-fat diet also results in sodium retention, which increases blood volume and drives up blood pressure. This was demonstrated in an experiment in which dogs were fed a high-fat diet for a period of five weeks. Not only did the dogs gain an average of 8 pounds, but their blood pressure and heart rate also rose considerably. By the end of the study, their diastolic blood pressure soared from 87 to 91 mm Hg, and the resting heart rate increased a whopping 20 beats per minute (from 83 to 113).The kind of fat you eat makes a difference, too. Fats that contribute to heart disease include cholesterol-laden saturated fats from meat, eggs and high-fat dairy products, and overly processed vegetable oils. When polyunsaturated vegetable oils are processed under high temperatures, they may transmute into unnatural breakdown products that are harmful to the arteries. Margarine and solid vegetable shortening are particularly dangerous as their processing results in the formation of toxic trans fatty acids. These altered fats – which are like nothing Mother Nature ever intended – interfere with some of your body’s important functions. In Part II you’ll learn about beneficial fats that actually help reverse hypertension.*28/313/5*

Google Bookmarks Digg Reddit del.icio.us Ma.gnolia Technorati Slashdot Yahoo My Web