OVERCOMING BARRIERS TO BDD TREATMENT: OVERCOMING RELUCTANCE TO TRY PSYCHIATRIC TREATMENT

Posted on March 19, 2011, under Anti Depressants-Sleeping Aid.

Some people are reluctant to try psychiatric treatment. The reasons vary. Sometimes, it’s a concern about stigma. For others, it’s fear of the treatments themselves, which is often based on a misunderstanding of them and possible side effects. Others insist that surgery is the solution. Sometimes this reluctance stems from a desire to “do it on my own,” and the person feels like a failure if they accept psychiatric care. While reluctance may be understandable, it shouldn’t keep you from getting treatment and getting better. Although SRIs can have side effects and CBT can be challenging, most people fare well with these treatments and easily tolerate them. You shouldn’t feel or look “drugged” while taking an SRI, and these medications aren’t addictive. If medication sjde effects occur, or CBT is too difficult, a good doctor or therapist will work with you and probably succeed in making them tolerable. I’ll say more about surgery in chapter 15, but as best we know it usually doesn’t work for BDD and may even make you worse. It isn’t a good substitute for psychiatric treatment. And trying to get better on your own is unlikely to work. Perhaps, if your BDD is mild, you may benefit from trying accepted CBT techniques on your own. But most people—and certainly those with moderate or severe BDD—will need professional help. As best we know, herbs, diet, “natural” remedies, and other strategies (other than SRIs or CBT) are unlikely to work.
When you overcome these barriers, the stage is set for a successful—in some cases a lifesaving—outcome. Anne, who had an excellent response to Celexa (citalopram) told me, “I’m feeling terrific, for the first time in 30 years.” Like some people I’ve treated who responded to medication, Ann “tested” the medication by trying to bring her obsession back. But she couldn’t. Sandy told me something similar: “The medication definitely curbs the obsession. It released a logjam. My life felt like a stream that had thousands of huge boulders and logs in it—the water couldn’t flow through smoothly. Now it flows with ease. I feel full of energy and creativity.” And after CBT, Jason felt that he—not the BDD— was in change of his life.
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OVERCOMING BARRIERS TO BDD TREATMENT: OVERCOMING RELUCTANCE TO TRY PSYCHIATRIC TREATMENT  Some people are reluctant to try psychiatric treatment. The reasons vary. Sometimes, it’s a concern about stigma. For others, it’s fear of the treatments themselves, which is often based on a misunderstanding of them and possible side effects. Others insist that surgery is the solution. Sometimes this reluctance stems from a desire to “do it on my own,” and the person feels like a failure if they accept psychiatric care. While reluctance may be understandable, it shouldn’t keep you from getting treatment and getting better. Although SRIs can have side effects and CBT can be challenging, most people fare well with these treatments and easily tolerate them. You shouldn’t feel or look “drugged” while taking an SRI, and these medications aren’t addictive. If medication sjde effects occur, or CBT is too difficult, a good doctor or therapist will work with you and probably succeed in making them tolerable. I’ll say more about surgery in chapter 15, but as best we know it usually doesn’t work for BDD and may even make you worse. It isn’t a good substitute for psychiatric treatment. And trying to get better on your own is unlikely to work. Perhaps, if your BDD is mild, you may benefit from trying accepted CBT techniques on your own. But most people—and certainly those with moderate or severe BDD—will need professional help. As best we know, herbs, diet, “natural” remedies, and other strategies (other than SRIs or CBT) are unlikely to work.When you overcome these barriers, the stage is set for a successful—in some cases a lifesaving—outcome. Anne, who had an excellent response to Celexa (citalopram) told me, “I’m feeling terrific, for the first time in 30 years.” Like some people I’ve treated who responded to medication, Ann “tested” the medication by trying to bring her obsession back. But she couldn’t. Sandy told me something similar: “The medication definitely curbs the obsession. It released a logjam. My life felt like a stream that had thousands of huge boulders and logs in it—the water couldn’t flow through smoothly. Now it flows with ease. I feel full of energy and creativity.” And after CBT, Jason felt that he—not the BDD— was in change of his life.*239\204\8*

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