Archive for February, 2011

DRUGS FOR ABSENCE AND OTHER GENERALIZED SEIZURES: WHAT MAY VALPROIC ACID CAUSE?

Posted on February 25, 2011, under Epilepsy.

In some children, valproic acid may cause an increase in the blood level of ammonia, leading to sleepiness, headache, nausea, or vomiting. Children with these symptoms should have a blood ammonia level test, and if the ammonia level is found to be elevated, the valproic acid dose should be decreased or the medication stopped.
Valproic acid itself rarely affects learning or behavior negatively. It seldom causes sleepiness. If these symptoms occur when the drug is started, they usually are a consequence of an increase in the level of some other drug the child is taking, particularly phenobarbital. Valproic acid increases the blood level of phenobarbital by 30 percent; thus, the dose of phenobarbital must be decreased by one-third when valproate is begun.
Valproic acid (Depakene) may be irritating to the stomach and cause nausea, vomiting, and a decrease in appetite. These symptoms decrease if the drug is taken along with meals. Depakote, a slightly different form of the drug, is said to have fewer effects on the stomach.
Weight gain, loss of appetite, and temporary loss of hair also occur in some individuals who are taking valproic acid.
Although the list of side effects of valproate seems long, we repeat that it is an excellent anticonvulsant drug, and, if used properly, it is also very safe.
*126\208\8*

DRUGS FOR ABSENCE AND OTHER GENERALIZED SEIZURES: WHAT MAY VALPROIC ACID CAUSE?In some children, valproic acid may cause an increase in the blood level of ammonia, leading to sleepiness, headache, nausea, or vomiting. Children with these symptoms should have a blood ammonia level test, and if the ammonia level is found to be elevated, the valproic acid dose should be decreased or the medication stopped.Valproic acid itself rarely affects learning or behavior negatively. It seldom causes sleepiness. If these symptoms occur when the drug is started, they usually are a consequence of an increase in the level of some other drug the child is taking, particularly phenobarbital. Valproic acid increases the blood level of phenobarbital by 30 percent; thus, the dose of phenobarbital must be decreased by one-third when valproate is begun.Valproic acid (Depakene) may be irritating to the stomach and cause nausea, vomiting, and a decrease in appetite. These symptoms decrease if the drug is taken along with meals. Depakote, a slightly different form of the drug, is said to have fewer effects on the stomach.Weight gain, loss of appetite, and temporary loss of hair also occur in some individuals who are taking valproic acid.Although the list of side effects of valproate seems long, we repeat that it is an excellent anticonvulsant drug, and, if used properly, it is also very safe.*126\208\8*

Google Bookmarks Digg Reddit del.icio.us Ma.gnolia Technorati Slashdot Yahoo My Web

THE SELF-POISONER: PATTERNS OF SELF-INDUCED TOXICITY – HOLDING ON TO THE PAST & THE GOOD OLD DAYS HOLDING ON TO THE PAST

Posted on February 15, 2011, under Weight Loss.

Another group of self-induced toxic behavior patterns is characterized by a person’s refusal to let go of obsolete attitudes, relationships, and experiences that were part of the reality of his past, but are inappropriate in the here and now. He poisons himself with outmoded attitudes and responses which complicate his life, distracting himself from focusing on his most important needs. In the end, he loses touch with the central aspects of his self and the ongoing process of discovering his evolving identity.
THE GOOD OLD DAYS
Holding on to the past is a way of cutting oneself off from nourishment in the present. Some people constantly complain about their present problems, and about social conditions, world affairs, etc., as if everything were bleak and nothing good ever happened. They contrast this with the “good old days” when people were more friendly and cared about one another. While there may be some minimal gratification in reminiscing about what living was like many years ago, the toxic effect can be quite devastating.
Memory is notoriously inaccurate; the past is a collection of fantasies. When a person clings to these fantasies and insists that his past really was as glorious as he remembers, he convinces himself that the present is dull, drab, and depressing. This kind of self-poisoning attitude destroys the nourishment (excitement, joy, and pleasure) in what is.
Mr. Brown to his family on the Fourth of July: “Those fireworks weren’t bad, but they just don’t make ‘em like they used to. When I was a kid, firecrackers had a much bigger bang and there were lots more of them. We really had fun in those days!”
*72\350\8*

THE SELF-POISONER: PATTERNS OF SELF-INDUCED TOXICITY – HOLDING ON TO THE PAST & THE GOOD OLD DAYSHOLDING ON TO THE PASTAnother group of self-induced toxic behavior patterns is characterized by a person’s refusal to let go of obsolete attitudes, relationships, and experiences that were part of the reality of his past, but are inappropriate in the here and now. He poisons himself with outmoded attitudes and responses which complicate his life, distracting himself from focusing on his most important needs. In the end, he loses touch with the central aspects of his self and the ongoing process of discovering his evolving identity.THE GOOD OLD DAYSHolding on to the past is a way of cutting oneself off from nourishment in the present. Some people constantly complain about their present problems, and about social conditions, world affairs, etc., as if everything were bleak and nothing good ever happened. They contrast this with the “good old days” when people were more friendly and cared about one another. While there may be some minimal gratification in reminiscing about what living was like many years ago, the toxic effect can be quite devastating.Memory is notoriously inaccurate; the past is a collection of fantasies. When a person clings to these fantasies and insists that his past really was as glorious as he remembers, he convinces himself that the present is dull, drab, and depressing. This kind of self-poisoning attitude destroys the nourishment (excitement, joy, and pleasure) in what is.Mr. Brown to his family on the Fourth of July: “Those fireworks weren’t bad, but they just don’t make ‘em like they used to. When I was a kid, firecrackers had a much bigger bang and there were lots more of them. We really had fun in those days!”*72\350\8*

Google Bookmarks Digg Reddit del.icio.us Ma.gnolia Technorati Slashdot Yahoo My Web

PSYCHOLOGICAL THERAPIES FOR PMS: MEDITATION

Posted on February 9, 2011, under Women's Health.

Meditation is not really so much a therapy as a way of life. Once you have learnt how to meditate you will want to practise the technique every day – whether you’re in good health or bad.
Meditation is not a ‘religious’ exercise, though many religions around the world use meditation to induce a feeling of peace and inner calm. Nor is it simply a case of sitting still for ten minutes. You need to learn to blot out the world so that you have a chance to listen to your ‘inner self’.
If you haven’t tried meditation before you may need a little practice before you get the hang of it, but you will. You can learn meditation by yourself at home but the best way is to join a class and get taught property.
One of the simplest techniques involves the following steps:
• Sit with a straight back, either in a chair or cross-legged on the floor, with your hands resting in your tap and your feet firmly on the ground, feet slightly apart.
• Close your eyes and take several slow breaths – make sure your abdomen swells out when you breathe in and sinks back when you breathe out (it is hard to relax if you are breathing with your upper chest).
• Repeat a neutral word over and over again in your mind slowly – this word will be your ‘mantra’ (it can be any word but many people choose evocative ones such as ‘one’, ‘peace’ or ‘flower’).
• If you feel your mind wandering, and it is natural for it to do so, turn your mind back to your counting or your mantra.
• Do this for 15 minutes.
• At the end of that time stop and sit quietly for a minute or so before opening your eyes and getting up slowly.
Clinical research has shown that regular meditation can reduce stress levels and is of use in treating stress-related conditions. Patients treated for high blood pressure have even been able to reduce their medication after taking up meditation.
*58\120\4*

PSYCHOLOGICAL THERAPIES FOR PMS: MEDITATIONMeditation is not really so much a therapy as a way of life. Once you have learnt how to meditate you will want to practise the technique every day – whether you’re in good health or bad.Meditation is not a ‘religious’ exercise, though many religions around the world use meditation to induce a feeling of peace and inner calm. Nor is it simply a case of sitting still for ten minutes. You need to learn to blot out the world so that you have a chance to listen to your ‘inner self’.If you haven’t tried meditation before you may need a little practice before you get the hang of it, but you will. You can learn meditation by yourself at home but the best way is to join a class and get taught property.One of the simplest techniques involves the following steps:• Sit with a straight back, either in a chair or cross-legged on the floor, with your hands resting in your tap and your feet firmly on the ground, feet slightly apart.• Close your eyes and take several slow breaths – make sure your abdomen swells out when you breathe in and sinks back when you breathe out (it is hard to relax if you are breathing with your upper chest).• Repeat a neutral word over and over again in your mind slowly – this word will be your ‘mantra’ (it can be any word but many people choose evocative ones such as ‘one’, ‘peace’ or ‘flower’).• If you feel your mind wandering, and it is natural for it to do so, turn your mind back to your counting or your mantra.• Do this for 15 minutes.• At the end of that time stop and sit quietly for a minute or so before opening your eyes and getting up slowly.Clinical research has shown that regular meditation can reduce stress levels and is of use in treating stress-related conditions. Patients treated for high blood pressure have even been able to reduce their medication after taking up meditation.*58\120\4*

Google Bookmarks Digg Reddit del.icio.us Ma.gnolia Technorati Slashdot Yahoo My Web