Archive for January, 2011

CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM AND HIGH-FAT DIET

Posted on January 31, 2011, under Cardio & Blood-Сholesterol.

Volumes of scientific literature support the negative impact of a high-fat diet on the cardiovascular system. A high-fat diet contributes to obesity, which increases peripheral resistance in the arterioles and can drive blood pressure up. It is a proven factor in atherosclerosis, which narrows the “pipes.” Fat also interferes with insulin utilization and contributes to insulin resistance, which is a significant factor in many cases of hypertension.
Dr. Salah Kassab, of the University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson, suggests that a high-fat diet also results in sodium retention, which increases blood volume and drives up blood pressure. This was demonstrated in an experiment in which dogs were fed a high-fat diet for a period of five weeks. Not only did the dogs gain an average of 8 pounds, but their blood pressure and heart rate also rose considerably. By the end of the study, their diastolic blood pressure soared from 87 to 91 mm Hg, and the resting heart rate increased a whopping 20 beats per minute (from 83 to 113).
The kind of fat you eat makes a difference, too. Fats that contribute to heart disease include cholesterol-laden saturated fats from meat, eggs and high-fat dairy products, and overly processed vegetable oils. When polyunsaturated vegetable oils are processed under high temperatures, they may transmute into unnatural breakdown products that are harmful to the arteries. Margarine and solid vegetable shortening are particularly dangerous as their processing results in the formation of toxic trans fatty acids. These altered fats – which are like nothing Mother Nature ever intended – interfere with some of your body’s important functions. In Part II you’ll learn about beneficial fats that actually help reverse hypertension.
*28/313/5*

CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM AND HIGH-FAT DIETVolumes of scientific literature support the negative impact of a high-fat diet on the cardiovascular system. A high-fat diet contributes to obesity, which increases peripheral resistance in the arterioles and can drive blood pressure up. It is a proven factor in atherosclerosis, which narrows the “pipes.” Fat also interferes with insulin utilization and contributes to insulin resistance, which is a significant factor in many cases of hypertension.Dr. Salah Kassab, of the University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson, suggests that a high-fat diet also results in sodium retention, which increases blood volume and drives up blood pressure. This was demonstrated in an experiment in which dogs were fed a high-fat diet for a period of five weeks. Not only did the dogs gain an average of 8 pounds, but their blood pressure and heart rate also rose considerably. By the end of the study, their diastolic blood pressure soared from 87 to 91 mm Hg, and the resting heart rate increased a whopping 20 beats per minute (from 83 to 113).The kind of fat you eat makes a difference, too. Fats that contribute to heart disease include cholesterol-laden saturated fats from meat, eggs and high-fat dairy products, and overly processed vegetable oils. When polyunsaturated vegetable oils are processed under high temperatures, they may transmute into unnatural breakdown products that are harmful to the arteries. Margarine and solid vegetable shortening are particularly dangerous as their processing results in the formation of toxic trans fatty acids. These altered fats – which are like nothing Mother Nature ever intended – interfere with some of your body’s important functions. In Part II you’ll learn about beneficial fats that actually help reverse hypertension.*28/313/5*

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GYNECOLOGICAL CANCER: COMMON REACTIONS

Posted on January 24, 2011, under Cancer.

We typically have a dominant reaction in one of four dimensions: Physical, Intellectual, Emotional or Spiritual. Most of the time these aspects of ourselves are in balance for the life we want to live. During cancer treatment, all of these factors will be changed depending on the particular aspect of the treatment, and over which we sometimes have little or no control. No one knows how they will react when the diagnosis is made; regrettably there is no magic formula we can share with you. We can, however, give you some insights that may lessen the impact of the more ‘overwhelming’ reactions.
I ended up having counseling to help deal with a lot of personality problems that were really detrimental to my health. I used to suffer from depression and felt unworthy. Counseling helped me deal with that.
Seline
I was in a state of denial about my psychological reactions to the cancer for a long time, although at the time I did not realize it. On discharge from hospital I embarked on a major community project. This urge ‘to save the world’ was a stupid thing to do at that time, as it depleted my emotional and physical resources and slowed my return to sound health. I now realize it was an abnormal need to have others see me as fit, well and professionally capable – as if nothing had ever happened! Had I put myself first, and restored ME, I am sure my recovery would have been a lot quicker. My advice to others is ‘self first’ and only when fully recovered THEN go and save the world!
Clara
It is a time when it is necessary for you or your carer to have acute awareness of any changes from your (or your carer/partner’s) ‘usual’ way of thinking and reacting, and acceptance of these as ‘normal’. And to also have the courage to suggest counseling if your reactions persist or plunge you into depression or extreme anxiety. If you are a naturally anxious personality type, any life change event can cause psychological turmoil. In this case it just happens to be cancer which triggers it.
*50/144/5*

GYNECOLOGICAL CANCER: COMMON REACTIONSWe typically have a dominant reaction in one of four dimensions: Physical, Intellectual, Emotional or Spiritual. Most of the time these aspects of ourselves are in balance for the life we want to live. During cancer treatment, all of these factors will be changed depending on the particular aspect of the treatment, and over which we sometimes have little or no control. No one knows how they will react when the diagnosis is made; regrettably there is no magic formula we can share with you. We can, however, give you some insights that may lessen the impact of the more ‘overwhelming’ reactions.I ended up having counseling to help deal with a lot of personality problems that were really detrimental to my health. I used to suffer from depression and felt unworthy. Counseling helped me deal with that.      Seline
I was in a state of denial about my psychological reactions to the cancer for a long time, although at the time I did not realize it. On discharge from hospital I embarked on a major community project. This urge ‘to save the world’ was a stupid thing to do at that time, as it depleted my emotional and physical resources and slowed my return to sound health. I now realize it was an abnormal need to have others see me as fit, well and professionally capable – as if nothing had ever happened! Had I put myself first, and restored ME, I am sure my recovery would have been a lot quicker. My advice to others is ‘self first’ and only when fully recovered THEN go and save the world!      Clara
It is a time when it is necessary for you or your carer to have acute awareness of any changes from your (or your carer/partner’s) ‘usual’ way of thinking and reacting, and acceptance of these as ‘normal’. And to also have the courage to suggest counseling if your reactions persist or plunge you into depression or extreme anxiety. If you are a naturally anxious personality type, any life change event can cause psychological turmoil. In this case it just happens to be cancer which triggers it.*50/144/5*

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THE CANDIDA-ASTHMA CONNECTION: ALLERGIC AND PATHOGENIC POTENTIAL OF CANDIDA

Posted on January 13, 2011, under Women's Health.

Although clinical descriptions of chronic fungal infections go back to the beginning of history, when Hippocrates first described the signs and manifestations of oral thrush, it has only been since original work by Dr Orian Truss, first published in 1978, that research in to the link between this organism and allergies really began. We have known for many years, however, that Candida albicans has the potential to invade many types of human tissue and to cause a multiplicity of health disorders. On the other hand, many (if not most) general practitioners considered the Candida organism to be responsible for only a limited number of conditions, notably vaginal, oral or nail thrush. They seem to have ignored the possibility that Candida albicans may sensitise a patient, quite separately from its ability to invade the body and cause localised infections.
There are over eighty species of Candida and at least six of these are known pathogens. The majority of Candida infections, however, are caused by Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis. The rates of Candida invasion are greater for hospitalised patients than for the population at large, making hospital a health hazard, at least as far as Candida is concerned.
The organism usually provokes an antibody’s response because of its adherence to mucosal epithelial surfaces in the respiratory, digestive and genital tracts. Candida glycoproteins have been shown to stimulate histamine release from mast cells and thus have a strong allergenic potential. Candida albicans has been found to be a factor in cases of urticaria (hives), irritable bowel syndrome, psoriasis and asthma.
Candida albicans is a potent bronchial antigen. In 1978 Dr Orian Truss proposed that the organism can cause sensitisation of other, distant organ systems and tissues. His work was later confirmed by other physicians and eventually expanded to show the existence of a ‘chronic candidiasis sensitivity syndrome’. That was the subject of one of my books by the same title, published in 1991, and of several papers I have given at Australian and international medical conferences.
This immune dysregulation can cause an increase in colonisation and eventually yeast by-products are released into the circulation.
Summary
Candida albicans can irritate, cause inflammation and disrupt intestinal mucosal surfaces (lumen) by adherence and thus cause indigestion and increase gut permeability (leaky gut).
Candida albicans can cause Type 1 hypersensitivities, such as urticaria and asthma; Type III sensitivity reactions, such as bronchopulmonary candidiasis; or Type IV reactions, altered cellular immune responses to Candida antigens.
The way in which an organism can be responsible for an allergy is known as its ‘sensitisation potential or capacity’.
*56\145\2*

THE CANDIDA-ASTHMA CONNECTION: ALLERGIC AND PATHOGENIC POTENTIAL OF CANDIDAAlthough clinical descriptions of chronic fungal infections go back to the beginning of history, when Hippocrates first described the signs and manifestations of oral thrush, it has only been since original work by Dr Orian Truss, first published in 1978, that research in to the link between this organism and allergies really began. We have known for many years, however, that Candida albicans has the potential to invade many types of human tissue and to cause a multiplicity of health disorders. On the other hand, many (if not most) general practitioners considered the Candida organism to be responsible for only a limited number of conditions, notably vaginal, oral or nail thrush. They seem to have ignored the possibility that Candida albicans may sensitise a patient, quite separately from its ability to invade the body and cause localised infections.There are over eighty species of Candida and at least six of these are known pathogens. The majority of Candida infections, however, are caused by Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis. The rates of Candida invasion are greater for hospitalised patients than for the population at large, making hospital a health hazard, at least as far as Candida is concerned.The organism usually provokes an antibody’s response because of its adherence to mucosal epithelial surfaces in the respiratory, digestive and genital tracts. Candida glycoproteins have been shown to stimulate histamine release from mast cells and thus have a strong allergenic potential. Candida albicans has been found to be a factor in cases of urticaria (hives), irritable bowel syndrome, psoriasis and asthma.Candida albicans is a potent bronchial antigen. In 1978 Dr Orian Truss proposed that the organism can cause sensitisation of other, distant organ systems and tissues. His work was later confirmed by other physicians and eventually expanded to show the existence of a ‘chronic candidiasis sensitivity syndrome’. That was the subject of one of my books by the same title, published in 1991, and of several papers I have given at Australian and international medical conferences.This immune dysregulation can cause an increase in colonisation and eventually yeast by-products are released into the circulation.SummaryCandida albicans can irritate, cause inflammation and disrupt intestinal mucosal surfaces (lumen) by adherence and thus cause indigestion and increase gut permeability (leaky gut).Candida albicans can cause Type 1 hypersensitivities, such as urticaria and asthma; Type III sensitivity reactions, such as bronchopulmonary candidiasis; or Type IV reactions, altered cellular immune responses to Candida antigens.The way in which an organism can be responsible for an allergy is known as its ‘sensitisation potential or capacity’.*56\145\2*

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